Ignite Budapest #3 speakers announced – be there on March 3!

Ignite Budapest #3 is tomorrow, Wednesday, March 3!  Come out and watch several fantastic speakers give 5-minute presentations on various topics, accompanied by a 20-slide powerpoint presentation.

The show starts at 7:30pm at Cotton Club (VI. corner of Jókai and Weiner Leó u., map).  700 Ft. entry, includes first drink!

  • Nine speakers! (see summaries of talks below)
  • PRESENTATION KARAOKE:  three speakers will have the opportunity to narrate a slideshow that they’ve never seen before.
  • CONTEST:  a fun contest that everybody can participate in with actual prizes!

see you there!

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PRESENTATION SUMMARIES:

  • Natalie Bowlus – “A Tragicomedy of Errors: British Shenanigans, WWI and the Creation of the Modern Middle East.”

With the prevalence of the Middle East in the news today, it is hard to imagine that a hundred years ago the same area was nothing more than the site of an ongoing struggle for influence between the Great Powers (England, France and Russia). At the Paris Peace Conference the stage was set for the Modern Middle East; however, the solution that emerged in 1919 was vastly different than that imagined at the beginning of the war. This presentation seeks to take the audience from point A to point B and examine how the final outcome was a product of accident, ignorance and good old-fashioned clock-and-dagger, double-crossing diplomacy as much as design.

  • Sandor Illes – “Be Innovative by Being Lazy!”

We, as humans, are quite lazy to change our usually boring and repetitive, every day tasks. But who is truly lazy, finds a way to get rid of these tasks easier, to spare that time to an extra coffee break. The others call these people inventive or innovative. I am going to show you some (mainly technological) examples how can we change our “cozily lazy” way of life to truly lazy style.

  • Peter Temesvary – “Something’s in the Air”

Let’s go flying!

  • Mary Murphy – “Verbally Challenged: How the L-word Lost Its Lustre”

In days gone by, when the leading man  told the pretty girl that he loved her, it was the same as a proposal of marriage. It meant something. Today, through overuse, misuse and  abuse, the L-word has lost it’s charm and its effectiveness, and with it, the world has lost its soul.

  • Howard Cohen – “How NOT to Do a Powerpoint Presentation”

After working in so many jobs that required me to do presentations or to train other people to do them, I have seen so many examples of presentations and seen so many people genuinely believe that they have the most amazing presentation skills when, in reality, they are sending their audience to sleep. I thought it was time for me to fight back! So I am going to show you how not to do a presentation. I just hope I don’t come too close to anything my fellow presenters have prepared!

  • Jeff Taylor – “Graffiti is Censorship”

The presentation will present the controversy of graffiti art by discussing it in its competing contexts with other art forms, namely architecture. Graffiti inevitably appropriates its platform, its canvas, from pre-existing objects, and in so doing degrades, and even denies those objects’ right to exist in their creators’ intended condition.

  • Justin Hyatt – “On the Active Life”

A long-time activist looks at what it means to take a part in the environment around you, what it means to be involved in things that matter, and a few tidbits from the field – and it’s all about finding your “hot button”.

  • Dániel Faragó – “Make Contributions Possible”

In the last seventy years people are sitting on the riverbank and are waiting for the the birds to fly in their mouth especially in Hungary. “What can we do alone against everybody else?” “I am not enough to make things matter!” The time of excuses is over. Making a contribution is easier than ever. And I’d love to make it happen, organised in grand.

  • Mark Andrews – “The Joys of Joyce: ‘he would wipe alley english spooker, multaphoniaksically spuking, off the face of the erse'”

There must be something cool about a guy who spends 17 years writing one book, especially a book that draws on 60 different languages to entertain its reader. This talk will take you on a humourous exploration of Joyce the river lover, Joyce the linguist, Joyce the EFL teacher and Joyce the lover of  Swiss Fendant white wine.  And without Trieste there would have been no Leopold Bloom. Trieste, ah Trieste, ate I my liver!